Posts tagged with Japan RSS

This serene glen, Kanmangafuchi, which in English goes by the forbidding name of the Kanman Abyss, is in Nikko, the temple town of the great shoguns. Tour buses roll up to Nikko’s dazzling shrines — Japan’s most lavish and elaborate — and re-enactors stage grand annual processions on its 400-year-old avenues. But Kanmangafuchi, a secondary attraction that doesn’t make it onto most day trippers’ agendas, is hidden and magical, a key to understanding why the shoguns built their monuments in this place and why Buddhist monks had put down roots hundreds of years earlier. Here, by the Daiya River, it was easy to feel the magnetism of the steep verdant hills, waterfalls, hot springs and volcanic mountains. Throw in a taste for the mystical, and Nikko would be a perfect place to seek enlightenment — or to enshrine yourself as a god. (full article)

Top photo: The Sacred Bridge arches over the Daiya River in Nikko. Kosuke Okahara for The New York Times

Middle photo: Stone steps lead to Rinnoji, the central Buddhist temple. Kosuke Okahara for The New York Times
Bottom photo: The garden of Tamozawa Imperial Villa. Kosuke Okahara for The New York Times
heyoscarwilde:

Godzilla VS. Mothra
illustration by Fawn Veerasunthorn :: via bluefootstudios.blogspot.ca

heyoscarwilde:

Godzilla VS. Mothra

illustration by Fawn Veerasunthorn :: via bluefootstudios.blogspot.ca


Yamaoka Tesshū (山岡 鉄舟?, June 10, 1836 – July 19, 1888) also known as Ono Tetsutarō, or Yamaoka Tetsutarō, was a famous samurai of the Bakumatsu period, who played an important role in the Meiji Restoration. He is also noted as the founder of the Itto Shoden Muto-ryu school of swordsmanship.
(via Wikipedia)

He was also a calligrapher and some of his works are at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Yamaoka Tesshū (山岡 鉄舟?, June 10, 1836 – July 19, 1888) also known as Ono Tetsutarō, or Yamaoka Tetsutarō, was a famous samurai of the Bakumatsu period, who played an important role in the Meiji Restoration. He is also noted as the founder of the Itto Shoden Muto-ryu school of swordsmanship.

(via Wikipedia)

He was also a calligrapher and some of his works are at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

パイロンと耳欠け黒猫 (by sabamiso)

パイロンと耳欠け黒猫 (by sabamiso)

看板犬 (by sabamiso)

看板犬 (by sabamiso)

沖縄写真日記六日目 (by sabamiso)

沖縄写真日記六日目 (by sabamiso)

しつけ中 (by sabamiso)
ETA: This photographer has a slew of great photos of cats!

しつけ中 (by sabamiso)

ETA: This photographer has a slew of great photos of cats!

JPN 2-2 USA (3-1 PKs)

theworldsgame:

Photo credit: Christof Stache/AFP

This is a final where having a winner felt unfair. Set up as a clash of styles, a clash of feel-good stories, a clash of very separate footballing (and social) cultures, the final between the USA and Japan delivered on what objective observers could want in a final: excitement, good play, and drama at the end. FIFA could take notes for the men’s next WC in 2014, as this final was better than the Netherlands-Spain final in Jo’burg last summer.

The USA started on the attack early, but could not finish somewhere between eight and ten solid first-half chances despite controlling the run of play and stopping the Nadeshiko from establishing their passing game, reducing them to waiting for a counterattack. It was a victory in and of itself for Japan to keep the score sheet clean in the first half. 

Come the 69th minute, the US finally made good on its chances: Megan Rapinoe found sub striker Alex Morgan (on for an injured Lauren Cheney at half), and she pocketed the finish. From there, the Yanks made a tactical error, going too early to a prevention mode to try and see out the rest of the half and stoppage time rather than attacking.

There is an adage in American football that applies to football of all kinds: when you play prevent defense, you are preventing yourself from winning — and Japan reinforced it again when a total howler occurred. Maruyama had broken through and wrong-footed both Rampone and Buehler in the US box. Buehler was able to tackle, but couldn’t clear, and Miyama tapped it past Hope Solo in the missed communication between keeper and center halves.  

1-1 at full time meant extra time, and at the 105th minute, it appeared the magic had struck again for the U.S., as Morgan found the godhead of Abby Wambach, who put it in the back of the net. The Japanese kept fighting back in the possession war, adding attackers and scoring on the most unusual of methods against a USA team much taller: a corner kick that found captain Homare Sawa. 

We found 2-2, and we found ourselves in penalty kicks, and it all came apart for the USA there. Tired legs, tired bodies, and frayed from having blown a lead twice, the Yanks tapped into their English ancestry in an unfortunate way. Shannon Box, Carli Lloyd, and Tobin Heath missed the first three kicks, which wound up being too much for Hope Solo to countenance. 

Japan’s first ever win over the US came on the biggest stage, under the biggest lights, and with the force of drama behind it (although I would prefer it if the American commentators would stop with the whole “healing a nation” trope for the Nadeshiko, we don’t really know how true it is.) They played with the spirit often attributed to the Americans after the Brazil victory; fighting to play from behind against a team taller and stronger (but not so much stronger as many would have you believe; the gap between #4 and #1 in FIFA rankings is not that wide.)

The American women gave a fine effort with few major errors, but the Nadeshiko earned the victory by playing to come back, adjusting its attack to bring attackers forward in crunch time, and nailing shots from the spot when it counted.

Well played, ladies.

zorica:

CLOTU IRL

I would not be able to leave without stealing one. Every time I visited. I would be banned for loving too much. Which is kind of what I think life has done to me in other ways, over and over and over again.

That’s awesome.  I wonder how that would go over here in the U.S.?

Cooking with Dog:  How to make Japanese food

IT’S NOT WHAT YOU THINK!

The dog is a poodle and a co-host in the video.  They make a Bento box (it’s really interesting).

(via Craftzine blog)

When we honestly ask ourselves which person in our lives mean the most to us, we often find that it is those who, instead of giving advice, solutions, or cures, have chosen rather to share our pain and touch our wounds with a warm and tender hand.

- Henri Nouwen

Also... Gnomes and gardens and cats and dogs and hiking and nature and nephews/nieces and more.

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